Let Me Call You Sweetheart

Words by Beth Slater Whitson. Music by Leo Friedman. (1910)
Recorded by Ruth Etting in 1931.

Let me call you Sweetheart
I’m in love with you.
Let me hear you whisper that you love me too.
Keep the lovelight glowing in your eyes so true
Let me call you Sweetheart
I’m in love with you!

I am dreaming, dear, of you
Day by day
Dreaming when the skies are blue,
When they’re gray;
When the silv’ry moonlight gleams,
Still I wander on in dreams
In a land of love, it seems
Just with you….

Let me call you Sweetheart
I’m in love with you.
Let me hear you whisper that you love me too.
Keep the lovelight glowing in your eyes so true
Let me call you Sweetheart
I’m in love with you!

2 Responses to Let Me Call You Sweetheart

  1. Madeline Mattera says:

    How would I obtain copyright permission to use the first the first few lines from the song “Let Me Call You Sweetheart in a book that I have written that is based on a true story. I was caregiver to my aunt who suffered with Alzheimer’s/Dementia. Prior to the onset of this dreaded disease that ravaged her mind and body, her husband would sing her that song. When she was at end of life, I would sing the song to her and she would respond to me as it would jog her memory to a place in time that she was able to recall. I would be truly humbled by the privilege of being granted permission to use. Please assist in providing me with your contact person. Respectfully Submitted, Madeline

  2. Hi Madeline,

    The fair use doctrine allows for the use of a line or two of a song’s lyrics, even if the song is still under copyright protection, if the purpose is criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research. Since your project doesn’t seem to fall in any of those categories, fair use wouldn’t cover you – and therefore you’d need permission from the copyright holder.

    But, as noted above, Let Me Call You Sweetheart was written by Beth Slater Whitson and Leo Friedman in 1910.

    The following is from the U.S. Copyright Office

    the maximum total term of copyright protection for works already protected by January 1, 1978, has been increased from 56 years (a first term of 28 years plus a renewal term of 28 years) to 95 years (a first term of 28 years plus a renewal term of 67 years). Applying these standards, all works published in the United States before January 1, 1923, are in the public domain.

    That said, if you can track down the last copyright holder, which may be a company or may be the heirs of the authors, then you could include the lyrics, with permission, which is always the safest route.

    Good luck with your book!

    Cheryl

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