Shaking the Blues Away

Words and music by Irving Berlin (1927)

There’s an old superstition ‘way down south
Ev’ry darkie believes that trouble won’t stay
If you shake it away
When they hold a revival way down south
Ev’ry darkie with care and trouble that day
Tries to shake it away

Shaking the blues away, unhappy news away
If you are blue, it’s easy to
Shake off your cares and troubles

Telling the blues to go, they may refuse to go
But as a rule, they’ll go if you’ll
Shake them away

Do like the darkies do, list’ning to a preacher way down south
They shake their bodies so, to and fro
With every shake, a lucky break

Proving that there’s a way to chase your cares away
If you would lose your weary blues
Shake them away

I gotta blues, you gotta blues
All God’s chillun gotta blues
Come and join a rebel and we’ll shake off the devil
And we’ll shake all over God’s Heaven, Heaven, Heaven
Anyone objectin’ to shakin’ ain’t going there, Heaven, Heaven
Gonna shake all over God’s Heaven
I gotta shake, you gotta shake
All God’s chillun gotta shake, shake, shake
Nothing could be sweeter than to shake with Saint Peter
When we shake all over God’s Heaven, Heaven, Heaven
Anyone objectin’ to shakin’ ain’t going there, Heaven, Heaven
Gonna shake all over God’s Heaven

[Revised version:]
There’s an old superstition ‘way down south
Ev’rybody believes that trouble won’t stay
If you shake it away
When they hold a revival way down south
Ev’rybody with care and trouble that day
Tries to shake it away

Shaking the blues away, unhappy news away
If you are blue, it’s easy to
Shake off your cares and troubles

Telling the blues to go, they may refuse to go
But as a rule, they’ll go if you’ll
Shake them away

Do like the voodoos do, list’ning to a voodoo melody
They shake their bodies so, to and fro
With every shake, a lucky break

Proving that there’s a way to chase your cares away
If you would lose your weary blues
Shake ‘em away

Shaking the Blues AwayIntroduced by Ruth Etting in the stage revue Ziegfeld Follies of 1927

Recorded by Ruth Etting on August 30, 1927 for Columbia Records. Originally issued on Columbia 1113 D (Matrix W144592). The flip side of the 78 had a song from the same show, It All Belongs To Me.

Ruth Etting charted on Billboard at #4 in 1927 with Shaking the Blues Away.

The song was revived by Ann Miller in Easter Parade, in 1948.

Shaking the Blues Away

This sheet music does not mention Ruth Etting’s name and the illustration isn’t a perfect rendition of her, but considering it was her first Broadway show, that is probably not unusual.  Eddie Cantor was the established star, so he is mentioned, even though it wasn’t his song. The drawing is of a recognizably blond, pretty girl, and that described Ruth at this point in her career in New York. And one thing is certain, even if her name wasn’t splashed on the sheet music, the song launched her on Broadway, and was a huge milestone in her career.

To see Ruth performing Shaking the Blues Away with a large chorus of dancers, go to the University Of Nebraska Online Display.

To find all references to Shaking the Blues Away on this site, click here!

Ten Cents a Dance

Ten Cents a DanceAvailable On:
Ten Cents a Dance - Ruth Etting
ASV/Living Era
Producer: Kevin Daly
Released: 1981

2 Responses to Shaking the Blues Away

  1. Kat says:

    I always thought this was from Easter Parade

  2. rick whitmore says:

    Yikes! That’s the WRONG MP3!

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